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Entries in Adam Rothenberg (254)

Thursday
Jun222017

Call Answered: Malcolm David Kelley: "Detroit," "Lost," "Antwone Fisher"

Malcolm David KelleyMalcolm David Kelley has gone from Lost to Detroit, traveling between television, film, and music. His first major acting role was that of "Young Antwone" in the Denzel Washington directed film Antwone Fisher. He then got Lost on the ABC Emmy Award winning drama, but eventually found himself on TeenNick's Gigantic, where he met his future singing partner Tony Oller, who then formed the group MKTO.

Now Malcolm is returning to the big screen in the highly anticipated crime drama DETROIT, based on the The Algiers Motel Incident during Detroit's 1967 12th Street Riot. DETROIT hits theaters on August 4th!

For more on Malcolm be sure to follow him on Twitter and Instagram!

1. Who or what inspired you to become an actor? I started acting when I was five years old. Just watching TV and kids in the McDonald's commercials having fun, I told my mom I wanted to do it. She found my managers, we had a meeting, and I ended up bookin' a McDonald's commercial. Then just growing up and continuing to act, I grew more in love with it. Watching Denzel Washington in Antwone Disher, direct and play in a movie, really opened my eyes on the many things you can do. So just then I was inspired to accomplish a lot in this industry.

Malcolm David Kelley as "Walt" on ABC's "Lost", Photo Credit: ABC2. Your first major acting role was in 2002, in the film Antwone Fisher, directed and starring Denzel Washington. What did you learn from working with Denzel Washington? Do you still keep in touch with Denzel today? I was born in 1992 lol so I was 10 going on 11 I think. As I mentioned a little in the answer above working with Denzel just opened my eyes to do so much. He was very involved in the audition processes all the way through. He is a great director and gets his vision across. Watching him direct made me realize that was something I wanted to do.

3. In 2004, you were cast as "Walt" on the Emmy Award winning ABC series Lost. What did you like most about your storyline? I loved working on Lost and going through that whole journey. From a pilot and not knowing where the show could go and then it turning into one of the biggest shows that still can be appreciated 10 plus years later is amazing. Working with that cast and me being one of the youngest cast mates there I just learned so much and soaked up so much from everyone. Loved my story line and how I can make things appear with my mind lol.

Malcolm David Kelley4. Let's just play with the Lost title/theme for a bit. If you got Lost on an island, how do you think you would survive? If you're being Lost was a choice and you could only bring five things with you, what would you bring? I think I would survive ok. lol Even though I hate bugs, I would get used to it lol. Eating salmon lol and fresh fish and fruit. The five things I would need on an island are my girlfriend, clean water, and my speaker.

5. What is one funny story from your time on Lost that you can share with us? One funny time is when we were shooting the pilot on the beach and their were wild hogs running around and I remember they caught them and we ate them lol.

6. In 2010, you appeared in the lead role of "Finn" on the TeenNick program Gigantic. In 2012, you and your former Gigantic co-star Tony Oller formed the pop duo MKTO. How long after meeting, did you you decide you form your own group? What has been the best part about working together and what's the most challenging part? Well while we were filming the first season and after we put songs on YouTube and fans loved it and our producers we signed to saw it, we met with them, cut some records, and then met with some labels ended up with Columbia Records. "Classic" went platinum. I will never forget that and the work we put in and meeting so many great people touring Australia and New Zealand and all of the U.S. and more. Can't wait to get back out there and just being on stage period and being on stage with Taylor Swift in front of 60k people.

7. Your newest single is "Hands Off Your Heart/"Places You Go." What are some favorite "Places You Go" to Eat? Relax? Exercise? Get Coffee/Tea? and Be A Child Again/Forever Young? What are some reasons you'd ask someone to take their "Hands Off Your Heart"? Hawaii definitely is a place I can go relax, eat, and exercise on the Basketball court. Def be a kid again lol. So many memories from filming Lost.

Reasons I would ask a girl to take her hands off my heart are not loving me how I love her or knowing we won't work but it might be right in the moment.

8. Up until now, you're career has been film, television, and music. Do you have any aspirations to come to Broadway? If so, would you want to star in a musical or play? If it had to be a play and musical from the current season, which ones would you like to be part of? I was so close to doing a play while being in my acting class but I ended up booking something so I didn't get to do it. It's on my bucket list to get on stage and do a musical or play. I remember my cousin doing The Lion King and Keke Palmer doing Cinderella. I went to see her as well and I have always admired the craft. As far as what play, not sure, but I like to play, have fun, and push boundaries, so you never know.

9. On August 4, you make your big screen return in the highly anticipated, DETROIT. The American period crime drama based on the The Algiers Motel Incident during Detroit's 1967 12th Street Riot. How do you feel this film relates now to the trying times we are living in where that moron of President is dividing this nation further and further apart, but the citizen's of the world are trying to keep it together? I feel everything happens for a reason. I'm just glad we are coming together realizing we have made progress but we have much more to do. We are being heard without having to rebel as we have in the past which has turned into some rioting. This time peace is a part of American history and some may know or may not know and as people we are strong enough to understand this movie has so much relevancy to today.

10. What did you learn about yourself, life, and those that supposedly protect us from making this film? Well for the people who protect us, I know sometimes they can abuse their authority as we are being victims to seeing this in real time. I think we need to have our communities' voices heard to stop this. So we need to have a conversation on protocol. What this film did for me is just enlightening me on this particular story in Detroit and reading up in other cities and my home town L.A.

11. On "Call Me Adam" I have a section called One Percent Better, where through my own fitness commitment, I try to encourage people to improve their own life by one percent every day. What is something in your life that you want to improve by one percent better every day? I want to improve on perfecting my crafts. Especially when people try to make you pick one thing. I want to put the work in to be respected at both.

Malcolm David KelleyMore on Malcolm:

At 25 years-old, Malcolm David Kelley is a veteran in the Entertainment Industry. Malcolm’s first major acting role was in the 2002 film Antwone Fisher starring Denzel Washington, where he played "Young Antwone" -- he was five. His next film role was You Got Served, in which he was cast in the supporting role of "Lil' Saint" where Malcolm played a boy fascinated with the world of street dance who gets caught up in gang mentality, with tragic consequences. The film, starring Steve Harvey, Lil’ Kim and B2K, opened at #1 and grossed $40 million.

In 2004, he was cast to play "Walt" in the ABC’s Emmy Award winning TV series Lost which became a huge cult success. Following his departure from the main cast of Lost, Malcolm appeared in several television roles, including the recurring character of "Benjamin Cooley" on Saving Grace, guest appearances on Glee, My Name is Earl, Law and Order SVU, Bones and dozens more. 

In 2010, he appeared in the lead role of "Finn" on the TeenNick program Gigantic. In 2012, Malcolm and his former Gigantic co-star Tony Oller formed the pop duo MKTO were signed to Columbia Records. The duo's debut self-titled album, was released on April 1, 2014 and spawned the hit single, "Classic" which reached number 14 on the Billboard Hot 100. MKTO recently released, "Hands Off My Heart/Places You Go" and are currently on tour.

On August 4, Malcolm returns to the big screen in the highly anticipated, "DETROIT." The American period crime drama film directed by Kathryn Bigelow and written by Mark Boal based on the The Algiers Motel Incident during Detroit's 1967 12th Street Riot. A police raid in Detroit in 1967 results in one of the largest citizen uprisings in United States history. The story is centered around The Algiers Motel Incident, which occurred in Detroit, Michigan on July 25, 1967, during the racially charged 12th Street Riot. It involves the death of three black men and the brutal beatings of nine other people: seven black men and two white women. The ensemble cast also includes: Anthony Mackie, John Krasinski, John Boyega, Laz Alonso, Kaitlyn Dever and Algee Smith.

Friday
Jun162017

Call Answered: Doug DeVita: The Phillie Trilogy at Fresh Fruit Festival

Doug DeVitaI first came to know Doug DeVita when he was the Marketing Director of the Abingdon Theatre Company. He invited to me Abingdon's production of Marathon '33 where I met special guest Lane Bradbury, the original "Dainty June" in Gypsy starring Ethel Merman. Lane seemed to be the thread that kept us going, reuniting us for Lane Bradbury: Let Me Entertain You, Again which Doug wrote. I loved that show and am so excited to see Doug's latest play The Phillie Trilogy which will be part of this year's Fresh Fruit Festival July 19-23.

The Phillie Trilogy is about Phillie growing up gay in the "fabulous" 70s which was no picnic for the precocious "Phillie McDougal." Through nuns, priests, bullying classmates, parents – and years later the realization his best friend may not be the person he thought she was – he lived to tell the tales, with results no one bargained for. Including him.

The Phillie Trilogy will play in the 2017 Fresh Fruit Festival at The Wild Project (195 East 3rd Street, between Avenue A & B) on July 19 at 6:30pm, July 22 at 4:30pm, and July 23 at 3:30pm. Click here for tickets!

For more on Doug be sure to visit https://www.dougdevitaplays.com and follow him on Facebook and Twitter!

1. I first came to know you when you worked at Abingdon Theatre Company as their Director of Marketing, but now you have switched gears and started writing more plays. Who or what inspired you to become a playwright? There were many roads I took to becoming a playwright; in addition to my career in the advertising world – which paid the bills – I was always concurrently involved in theatre. I’ve acted, I’ve directed, I was Artistic Director of the now-defunct Westside Repertory Theatre for a brief stint, and I even wrote reviews for OOBR (Off-Off Broadway Review) for a few years (until I realized I hated the person it was turning me into). It was while I was writing for OOBR that I developed a friendship with Carrie Libling, the head of Vital Children’s Theater, and she’s the one who cajoled, prodded, and pushed me into writing my first produced play – I wrote the book for a musical based on the enchanting Charles and Mary Lamb prose version of Shakespeare’s The Tempest; in the early 19th century, the Lambs wrote adaptations for children of most of the Bard’s plays, and they’re truly delightful. After the success of The Tempest, Vital commissioned another one from me (As You Like It), which was another success for them. I was then invited by another writer to collaborate on some more "adult" fare; I haven’t stopped writing since.

2. Your latest play, The Phillie Trilogy is going to be part of the 2017 Fresh Fruit Festival. Why did you want this show to be part of this festival? I’ve generally avoided festivals in the past; they’re a lot of work, they cost a lot of money, and I hate, loathe, and despise self-producing. But I’m a submission junkie, and last year I sent Fresh Fruit the script for my play The Fierce Urgency Of Now, not expecting anything. Well, it was accepted into the festival, and after a lot of hemming and hawing on my part (and some more prodding, this time from my friend Bob Ost, who’d done the Fresh Fruit Festival already and had a very positive experience) I decided, "What the hell, let’s do it." And it was a dream experience. They’re a smaller festival, so there’s a lot of attention paid to details, they’re a wonderfully warm, human group of people to work with, and the tone set by Executive Director Louis Lopardi and Artistic Director Liz Thaler invites you to really feel like you’re a part of something magical. There was no question in my mind – or in the mind of my brilliant director, Dennis Corsi ­– that we would submit The Phillie Trilogy this year. After several readings, and having won Scrap Mettle Arts Emerging Playwrights Program’s inaugural competition last year, Dennis and I felt it was time to see Phillie on his feet, and Fresh Fruit was the perfect place for this first steps. Again, there were no expectations we’d even be accepted, but we’re thrilled that we were.

"The Phillie Trilogy" 2017 Fresh Fruit Festival cast, Front: Maeve Press (Barbie), Daniel G. Cunningham (Keith/Jude), Bonale Fambrini (Phillie). Back: Carole Monferdini (Older Grace/Lina), Karen Irwin (Younger Grace/Barbara), Terri Kelsey (Veronica/Sheila), David Sabella (Pete/Philip).3. The Phillie Trilogy tells the tale of budding writer "Phillie McDougal" and the struggles he went through growing up gay in the "fabulous" 70s including the realization his best friend may not be the person he thought she was. How do you think "Phillie's" realization about his friend will affect his future friendships? Not a clue. The play ends with that question, actually; I’ve been asked many times what happens to "Philip" and "Barbara," and my answer is always the same: "Not a clue. What’s your fantasy?"

4. What do you think made "Phillie" able to survive all the hurt he encountered throughout his life to keep going as opposed to giving up? His wit. And his ability to realize that even though he had a contentious relationship with his parents – who definitely raised him with a barrage of mixed signals – they ultimately gave him, albeit reluctantly on the part of his father, the freedom to become who he was meant to become.

5. What were some struggles you went through growing up gay? I was bullied mercilessly in high school; I had lit cigarettes tossed at me, I was locked into lockers, I was followed on the street by schoolmates shouting taunts at me, the gym teacher called me a tub of shit in front of the entire school during an assembly…After I graduated, I left that school and never looked back. It’s interesting to me that I have a lot of friends from grammar school – kids I haven’t seen in over 40 years – who’ve looked me up on Facebook and we’ve reconnected, but very few from high school have sought me out, nor I them. And I’m absolutely fine with that.

"The Phillie Trilogy" ​Scrap Mettle Arts Reading, October 2016 Front: Zachary Clarence as "Phillie McDougal," and Kevin Ligon as "Pete McDougal" Back: Diane Chen as "Barbie," Karen Irwin as "Veronica McDougal"6. What was the most "fabulous" thing about growing up in the 70s? The Broadway shows and performers I got to see: the original casts of A Chorus Line and Chicago, Angela Lansbury in Gypsy and Sweeney Todd, The Andrews Sisters in Over Here!, Madeline Kahn in On The Twentieth Century, Irene Worth and a very young Meryl Streep in The Cherry Orchard, Frank Langella in Dracula, George C. Scott and the brilliant Jack Gilford in Sly Fox...so many wonderful experiences! (Such a gay answer! HAHAHA!) I also loved the grittiness of New York City; many of my relatives were shocked my mother allowed a 14 year old to go into Manhattan by himself, but she understood that the city, and seeing Broadway shows, was my refuge. Being a Manhattan native herself (she was born and spent her early childhood in Hell’s Kitchen), she passed on her street smarts to me, and was confident I could take care of myself. I miss that city. Mostly I miss being able to navigate quickly through Times Square. But there was something about the scrappy, dirty, slightly dangerous New York City of the 70s that was giddily exciting, something that’s sadly missing in the somewhat sanitized yet far more dangerous version we’re living in now. New York in the 70s was like one of those seedy but entertaining carnivals: you had to be careful but if you knew how to negotiate around some of the smarmier aspects, you were fine; today it feels more like that candy-coated, brightly-colored, but terrifying island "Pinocchio" barely escapes from in Disney’s animated classic.

7. If Doug today could tell Doug of his youth three pieces of advice, what would they be? You’re better than you realize, you’re smarter than you realize, and listen to your mother. Yes, she’s a pain in the ass, but you’re more like her than you want to admit, and deep down you know she’s right, dammit.

Doug DeVita, director James Phillip Gates, and the 2017 staged-reading cast of "The Phillie Trilogy" produced by The Great Griffon / Seeking The Queer Voice Reading Series at 13th St. Rep 8. If this show is based upon any of your life events, what would you say today to those you bullied you in school? How do you react now to someone who may say an off comment about being gay? 

1: Yes, that’s you in the play. [Gives a "Bronx Cheer"]

2: Fuck off. (My husband is convinced I’m going to be shot some day).

9. What do you hope audiences come away with after seeing The Phillie Trilogy? Since this has the word trilogy in the title, will there be two more plays after this? Second question first: It’s actually not a "trilogy" in the strictest sense; although I wrote the play in a traditional three-act structure, only the first part, titled Checking The Basement For Leaks, can stand alone as a short play; indeed, in that format it has had productions in New York, New Jersey, Connecticut, and Washington State. The title actually refers to the books the adult "Philip" has written; in order to clarify this (and inspired by the inspired graphic design created by Christina D’Angelo), I’m mulling a title change to Phillie’s Trilogy after this production closes. So no, there won’t be any more plays with these characters.…For the time being, at least.

What do I hope audiences come away with? I hate this question.…I want them to be entertained, first and foremost…I want them to laugh their asses off one minute and then gasp in recognition the next…I want them to have a theatrical experience that allows for a spirited post-show discussion about what they’ve just seen, perhaps over a few martinis or beers...that’s the best answer I can give without falling down that rabbit hole of self-important playwright pretension.

10. On "Call Me Adam" I have a section called One Percent Better, where through my own fitness commitment, I try to encourage people to improve their own life by one percent every day. What is something in your life that you want to improve by one percent better every day? I try every day to be a little less judgmental, a little more forgiving, and a little less controlling. Coming from a long line of judgmental Catholic control freaks, let me tell you: It’s a bitch.

Doug DeVitaMore on Doug:

A member of the Dramatists Guild of America, Doug’s play The Fierce Urgency Of Now was produced at the 2016 Fresh Fruit festival, where it won four Fresh Fruit Awards of Distinction, including Outstanding Play, Outstanding Production for director Dennis Corsi, and two Outstanding Supporting Performance awards. Other work includes The Phillie Trilogy, which won Scrap Mettle Arts Inaugural Emerging Playwrights Program competition, and was chosen to inaugurate Great Griffon’s Seeking The Queer Voice reading series in January 2017; The Gruesomely Merry Adventures of NELL DASH, An Irrepressibly Sensible Capitalist With A Vengeance (Winner of two Winterfest Competition ’17 Awards: Best Set Design, and a Best Director nod to Dennis Corsi); and Just A Rumor (co-written with Gary Lyons) which was a semi-finalist at the Eugene O’Neill Playwright’s Conference and has had readings at New York’s Abingdon Theatre Company and London’s Menier Chocolate Factory. His ten-minute play, Checking The Basement for Leaks (the first play in The Phillie Trilogy) has been performed at the Gallery Players Black Box Festival in New York, The Driftwood Players Short Works Festival in Seattle, Ramapo College in New Jersey, and The Warner International Playwrights Festival in Connecticut. He has also collaborated with actress Lane Bradbury (the original "Dainty June" in Gypsy, starring Ethel Merman) on her one-woman show Lane Bradbury: Let Me Entertain You, Again, which was performed at the Strasberg Institute in Los Angeles, and at Feinstein’s/54 Below in New York.

Doug belongs to both The 9th Floor Playwrights Collaborative and The 36th Street Writers Block (formerly Abingdon Theatre Playwrights Group 1) in Manhattan.

He has also worked as an Art director/Copywriter for such advertising agencies as Grey Global Group, J. Walter Thompson, and N.W. Ayer, and was the marketing director for Abingdon Theatre Company for four years. He is currently an Adjunct Associate Professor in the Advertising Design Department at F.I.T. in New York. Please produce his work so this part of his life can become a (sometimes) pleasant memory.

Tuesday
Jun132017

Call Redialed: Lane Bradbury: "Let Me Entertain You, Again" at Don't Tell Mama

Lane Bradbury, Photo Credit: Angelique HannahThey say the third time's a charm and that couldn't be more true. I have interviewed Lane Bradbury, Broadway's original "Dainty June" in Gypsy twice before about her upcoming one-woman show Let Me Entertain You, Again, but this time around, we really got deep into the heart of this show, Lane's struggles, her freedoms, and most of all, the backstage drama of Lane's time working with Ethel Merman & Jerome Robbins in Broadway's original production Gypsy!

Written by Doug DeVita and directed by Elkin Antoniou, Let Me Entertain You, Again is a highly personal tour of how Lane Bradbury went from being an Atlanta Debutante to a performer on "The Great White Way" during the Golden Age of Broadway. Songs include "Gee, But It's Good To Be Here," "Corner Of The Sky," and "Another Hundred People," among others, as well as four songs from Gypsy: "Broadway," "Everything's Coming Up Roses," "If Momma Was Married," and, of course, "Let Me Entertain You."

Let Me Entertain You, Again played it's first return engagement on June 6 and will now play it's second performance Thursday, June 29 at 7pm at Don't Tell Mama in NYC (343 West 46th Street, between 8th & 9th Avenue). Click here for tickets!

For more on Lane be sure to visit http://lanebradbury.com and follow her on Facebook and Twitter!

1. This June you are bringing back your one-woman show, Let Me Entertain You, Again to NYC, but this time you are performing it at Don't Tell Mama. What made now the right time to return with this show? I got an amazing manager by the name of Stephen Hanks and this was the first thing we did together, so that's why now.

2. Why did you want to do this run at Don't Tell Mama? It's a classic place. I love the intimacy of the venue. I mean "Don't Tell Mama," the title alone just sounds so enticing and it adds a little bit of sweet wickedness to that name. And I've seen other cabaret shows there, so I just felt the venue was perfect for me.

Me: Also since you created the role of "Dainty June" in Broadway's Gypsy and you had "Mama" in that show, "Mama Rose," maybe there's a little tie in there with "Don't Tell Mama." 

Lane: You just put that together, [laughs], but "Mama" sure does stand out.

Lane Bradbury in "Let Me Entertain You, Again" at Don't Tell Mama 2017, Photo Credit: Stephen Hanks3. What do you hope to gain from this return engagement that you did not get from your previous mountings of this show? I would like to keep the momentum going and get more engagements of Let Me Entertain You, Again because it's so much fun to do.

Me: Well, it's a lot of fun to watch.

4. This is the third production of Let Me Entertain You, Again that I will be coming to see. Where do you hope this show will take you/your career? I would love to do another Broadway musical. That would just be the perfect icing on the cake. I would love to do a play too, but prefer a musical because I love music. 

5. Which part of the show, Let Me Entertain You, Again, is the hardest for you to perform? Which part is the most fun? There is no hard part, just fun. I talk about this in the show, but I came back to this show with a lot of fear, so much so that it paralyzed me. I would get sooo furious when I got something wrong, but after working with my daughter Elkin Antoniou and her husband film director Bobby Garabedian, they really got me me to loosen up and absolutely fall into freedom and joy and let the mistakes become okay. I've known this from acting, sometimes the best moments are the times when you make a mistake and then something real takes over. You go into your unconscious and something wonderful comes out. That's just a great thing to know and to try to live by. Elkin and Bobby really showed me that.

Lane Bradbury in "Let Me Entertain You, Again" at Don't Tell Mama 2017, Photo Credit: Stephen Hanks6. In our very first interview back in 2009, I asked you "What was your worst experience in a show?" At that time, you had said "Working with Jerome Robbins in Gypsy was your worst experience." If Gypsy were being mounted today with you, Ethel Merman, and Jerome Robbins as director and choreographer, how do you think Lane Bradbury of today would handle those big personalities as opposed to Lane Bradbury of yesterday? I hope, with Jerry, from the experiences I've had and the years I've got under my belt would help me not become so paralyzed by his personality and that I would say something like "You know you want a good performance from me. I want a good performance too. The best way to get that is to be positive with me and encourage me, rather than put me down because, now, I have to rise above all your negativity and that's just really hard to do. So you are making your job and my job harder."

With Merman, I don't know how you communicate with somebody who doesn't communicate. Unless, in the interim, she had grown some or exerpienced something in life that would have changed her, I would probably do the same that I did back then, just do the best performance I could do and pretend I was working with someone else, rather than actually working with her. That's one of the things we learn to do in method acting, if the character or the other actor in the scene doesn't work for you in the way they should, then you think they are someone else so it doesn't hang you up. It makes it real for you.

Me: That says so much about the struggle you went through at the time and it's great to hear how much stronger you are now and rise above it all.

Lane: I sure hope so. As artists there is something very delicate and exposed about us and that needs to be protected. That was something Jerome Robbins, I don't think really understood, although he went to the studio, so he was taught that, but a lot of people that know the method seem to have something about their personality where they just can't be as positive as we would like them to be. As artists we have to adjust the best we can and somehow be able to use whatever they are giving us to be better and not let ourselves go down into that negative place where there is no getting back from.

Me: Well, I think you would be able to do it.

Lane: I think I would too. [Laughs]. But I'm looking back over the road at how difficult that was.

Me: Sure and at the time you were just a teenager.

Lane: I was 17. Until that time, I had never come across that negativity. My ballet teacher was an angel and the most positive being in my life. Then when I did Ondine, they just encouraged everything I did, so when I got with Jerry Robbins, it was such a shocker, just something out of the blue.

Me: Especially after coming from such a positive reinforcement with your ballet teacher to go to his negativity, I'm sure it was quite a shock.

Lane: It was. Truly, truly, truly.

Lane Bradbury in "Let Me Entertain You, Again" at Don't Tell Mama 2017, Photo Credit: Stephen Hanks7. With your dream of coming back to Broadway, if you could be put into any show currently running on Broadway or coming next season, which show or shows would you like to be part of? I don't get into Manhattan a lot to go to the theatre, but I'd love to play "Diana" in a revival of Next To Normal (even though I'm probably too old for the part, I could pull it off). That would be the pennacle role for me.

Me: I think you could pull it off. I remember in one of our previous interviews you mentioned wanting to work with Tom Kitt and Brian Yorkey and how you'd love them to write you a musical about "Diana" after she gets out of treament. So, let's put this out there again for that to happen.

Lane: Yes, lets. And the other show I'm really really right for would be Pippin. While I was doing Let Me Entertain You, Again in LA, someone said to me, "Lane, you should play 'Madame Rose'" in Gypsy. I thought, I could do that, even though I feel my size would work a little bit against me, my voice would work for me. I wish I knew more of the current season, but I'm hoping Let Me Entertain You, Again, will put me in a better position to see more shows.

8. On "Call Me Adam" I have a section called One Percent Better, where through my own fitness commitment, I try to encourage people to improve their own life by one percent every day. What is something in your life that you want to improve by one percent better every day? I would still love to drop away the negativity that comes into your mind when something doesn't go right and replace it with the magic and wonder that is positive. I know to do that, but it's so easy for the little dark thoughts to invade us, but the quicker we can get over those, shed them and put something positive in there, the better off we are. It's a habbit we need to do.

Me: You have to consciously work at it, to put the postive in your mind and not let the negative take over.

Lane: Right.

Lane Bradbury, Photo Credit: Angelique HannahMore on Lane:

Lane Bradbury created the role of "Dainty June" in Broadway's Gypsy starring Ethel Merman. Her other stage credits include J.B., The Night of the Iguana, and Marathon '33. Her film credits include Alice Doesn't Live Here Anymore, Hawaii, The Barony, and Consenting Adults, and her TV work includes In the Heat of the Night, Kung Fu, The Rockford Files, The Partridge Family, The Waltons, and The Mod Squad.

Thursday
Jun082017

Call Redialed: EXCLUSIVE NEW "Orange is the New Black" Facetime Interview with Annie Golden "Norma Romano" 

Annie Golden as "Norma Romano" on Netflix's "Orange is the New Black"Live from The Algonquin Hotel, "Call Me Adam" sits down for an all NEW EXCLUSIVE interview with Orange is the New Black's Annie Golden ("Norma Romano," the mute)!

We talk about everything Orange is the New Black! From what made Annie want to be part of the show to what she thinks "Norma's" first speaking words would be to acting with her senses! It's an insider's dream come true!

Orange is the New Black Season 5 drops 6/9 on Netflix!

If you missed my theatrical interview with Annie Golden, you can watch it here!

"Call Me Adam's" EXCLUSIVE NEW Orange is the New Black Facetime interview with Annie Golden ("Norma Romano"):

Watch Orange is the New Black Season 5 Trailer here:

Wednesday
Jun072017

Call Answered: Robbie Rozelle: "Songs From Inside My Locker" at Feinstein's/54 Below

Robbie RozelleFor many people, high school sucks. It was some of the worst years of my life from the teasing to my head being hit into a metal poll in the gym locker room, I couldn't wait to get out of dodge. The best part about adulthood is looking back to see how far you've come and for Robbie Rozelle, he has come a long way! He has directed & written or co-written sold-out shows for Tony nominees Kate Baldwin (Finian's Rainbow) & Melissa Errico (Amour), Elena Shaddow (The Visit), Nikka Graff Lanzarone (Women on the Verge), RuPaul's Drag Race season 7 contestant Mrs. Kasha Davis and frequent collaborator Jessica Vosk ("Elephaba" on the Wicked tour), and this September 9, Robbie will be directing my comedic cabaret debut called Dates of Discontent at The Laurie Beechman Theatre!

But before that happens, Robbie will be making his solo cabaret debut with Songs From Inside My Locker this Friday, June 9 at Feinstein's/54 Below (254 West 54th Street) at 9:30pm! Wandering his high school hallways, Robbie would often find himself shoved in a locker for singing from The Rink too loudly. With his signature wit and style, Robbie grabs the tiger by the tail in a hilarious romp of the songs that got him through a blistering high school experience, featuring a treasure trove of songs ranging from Kander & Ebb to Carrie. Songs From Inside My Locker is the balm to the chaos of these crazy times. Click here for tickets!

For more on Robbie be sure to visit https://www.robbierozelle.com and follow him @divarobbie on FacebookTwitter and Instagram!

Robbie Rozelle, Photo Credit: Dianna Bush Photography1. This June you are making your debut solo show at Feinstein's/54 Below with Songs From Inside My Locker. After directing shows for Jessica Vosk, Melissa Errico, Kate Baldwin and Nikka Graff Lanzarone, what made now the right time to make your solo debut? It seems that the shows I wrote/co-wrote for them (in addition to directing) all had my fingerprints on them, specifically the jokes. After this past election, I just decided that I wasn’t going to let anything scare me, including getting up in front of a crowded room of 150 people, who have all paid a great deal to get in, and sing 15 songs.

2. Who or what inspired you to become a performer? Honestly, it was seeing all those movie musicals – The Wizard of Oz had a profound effect on me. I miss those yearly airings where you gathered with your family around the TV for an event. I guess the closest things to that now are the live musicals like The Wiz and Grease. And with social media, the family has grown rather large.

3. Your musical direction is by Josh D. Smith. As a director/writer yourself, do you find it difficult to let someone else direct your own show? Do you ever try to give your "director" input? I’ve known Josh for over 20 years. He’s just so wonderful. He’s also taken my rudimentary ideas and made them real things – that’s really great since I don’t read music. I wrote and directed the thing myself, but his input is invaluable. Wait until you hear his incredible arrangements!

4. This show is called Songs From Inside My Locker. What songs would we find in high school Robbie's locker and what songs would we find in adult Robbie of today? High school was a weird time for me – I sang a lot of hybrids of movie musicals (The Sound of MusicFunny GirlThe Wizard of Oz) and the popular musicals of the time were Phantom of the Opera and Les Miz. The first two cassette tapes I ever bought were Dionne Warwick’s Greatest Hits (1972-1990), because "That’s What Friends Are For" was the first song, and the Beaches soundtrack, for the obvious reasons.

Nowadays, I listen to mostly show tunes (both for my job and because I love them), a lot of Ella Fitzgerald, and a lot of acoustic pop like Jason Mraz. Shout-out to whoever created the "Acoustic Covers" and "Your Favorite Coffeehouse" playlists on Spotify, because that gets a lot of love in my house.

Robbie Rozelle, Photo Credit: Dianna Bush Photography5. You describe Songs From Inside My Locker as being the balm to the chaos of wandering your high school hallways, and finding yourself often shoved in a locker for singing from The Rink too loudly. Let's see how well you did in math...If there are 4 years in high school, 180 days in the school year, 5 days in the week, and 8 hours in the day, how many times do you think you were shoved in a locker during your high school years? I…was terrible in math. Legitimately terrible. Also, I had three lockers (my main one, my choir one, and gym), so suffice it to say, I was in one more than I was in a classroom.

6. Why did you want this show about this particular time in your life, be your debut show? I really loathe the cabaret trope of "I moved to NYC to become an actress, and had my heart broken," so I needed to find a hook for it. I think the answer became clearer when I realized that the high school bully was in the highest office in the land. So I just want to have a joy explosion all over Feinstein’s/54 Below of all the songs I was bullied for singing, with people paying a lot of money for the privilege.

7. Being so far (you're welcome for hinting at your age) out of high school, what was it like to go back to this time in your life now? Did old emotions come up? What did you learn about yourself from writing this show that you didi not know about yourself going through this rough time? Looking at that time of my life through the prism of time, it’s a bit weird. I was looking at some old photos, and there I am in overalls with one strap hanging, and bad mushroom haircuts, and thinking "man, I was so skinny!" I’ve always had the gift of bounce and laughter, so while things really sucked in high school, I’m able to laugh at most of it. Weirdly, since this show was announced, a lot of my high school peeps (some I don’t even remember) have reached out – some to apologize for their high school behavior, some to congratulate me about the show, some to say they would be there. I was openly gay in high school, in a pre-Ellen, pre-Will & Grace era, so I realize that my visibility was really important. That knowledge has had a profound impact on me.

Robbie Rozelle8. While writing this show, what part made you cry? What part made laugh? What part made you go, "I'm so much stronger now"? My first day of high school, four seniors grabbed me, wrapped me in the mat that was in front of the main doors, and dropped me next to the dumpster. I was all of maybe 130 pounds. That was terrifying, but it also told me that I better pull myself up by my bootstraps, because it wasn’t going to be amazing all the time. But I also gravitated to a group of senior girls, who took me under their wing and took care of me. Those ladies made sure that I wasn’t thoroughly terrorized. They were probably my first audience, people who would laugh at my jokes, and became my tribe. I have no doubt in my mind that I would not be alive but for those strong women and the musical theatre. So, that’s the dark. But with dark stuff, there’s light, right? Someone asked me what I would tell 16 year old me, and I gotta say, I’d tell him to do exactly the same thing. I’m just fine. I’m doing things I love with people I love, and I can’t think of honestly anything better (except maybe a woman President).

9. Besides this hilarious romp through high school, what other romps have these songs you are presenting accompanied you through? Literally every thing in my life. They were my playlist to accompany my life from start to finish. We have a Charles Nelson Reilly/Paul Lynde medley in the show, because those guys were my heroes – quippy funny men who weren’t ashamed of who they were.

10. On "Call Me Adam" I have a section called One Percent Better, where through my own fitness commitment, I try to encourage people to improve their own life by one percent every day. What is something in your life that you want to improve by one percent better every day? I’d love to give up carbonated beverages and biting my nails. I don’t know how to do that by one percent daily, but that’s the goal! (Told you I was terrible at math!)

Robbie Rozelle, Photo Credit: Kate Lumpkin More on Robbie:

Robbie Rozelle does jokes. He has also directed and written or co-written sold-out cabaret shows for Tony Award nominee Melissa Errico (Amour), Tony nominee Kate Baldwin (Finian's Rainbow), Elena Shaddow (The Visit), Nikka Graff Lanzarone (Women on the Verge), Steven Ferezy, Jonathan Demar, Rachel Levy, RuPaul's Drag Race season 7 contestant Mrs. Kasha Davis and frequent collaborator Jessica Vosk ("Elephaba" on the Wicked tour).

As a former actor who once played "Charlie Brown" and "Dr. Frank 'n' Furter" in the same year, Robbie is the recipient of the NEPTA award for Best Supporting Actor in a Musical for his tongue-twisting turn as "Trevor Grayden" in Thoroughly Modern Millie. He has also appeared in Sondheimas at 54 Below and several shows at The Duplex. He co-produced the album Cynthia Erivo and Oliver Tompsett Sing Scott Alan [Deluxe Edition], executive produced Astoria Boulevard's debut album and was an associate producer of Jonathan Reid Gealt's Whatever I Want It To Be. Robbie is a Grammy voting member. For three years, Robbie served as the graphic designer and creative director for Playbill, culminating in the design he is most proud of, the branding of #PlaybillPride, a 30-day initiative of the LGBT movement in the theatre that included a redesign of their historic logo for the month of June 2014. Playbill Pride returned for a second year in 2015, where Robbie art directed the magazine. Playbill Pride returned again in 2016, again with Robbie's work. He currently serves as the in-house designer for Grammy-winning record label Broadway Records, where he designed the iconic "What the World Needs Now is Love" in response to Pulse nightclub shooting in Orlando. He also runs Ghostlight Design. When not designing, he can usually be found tweeting jokes and random musings at @divarobbie.